“What began as a handful of reform-minded dreamers is now a cutting-edge leader in policy and practice. 30 years in, our groundbreaking and data-driven work has created dramatic change in the lives of our region’s most vulnerable children.”

In the late 1980s and early 90s, the United States was gripped by a drug epidemic. Cheap, readily available crack cocaine created a crisis in communities already wracked by rising poverty and homelessness. Children in those communities were the hardest-hit. Soon, there were more children in foster care than there were parents to care for them. Many spent their entire childhoods in the system, “aging out” of foster care at 18 to face harrowing rates of unemployment, homelessness, and incarceration.

As this epidemic grew, a pioneering group of social workers and foster and adoptive parents gathered to start a new organization dedicated to keep kids from falling through the cracks. They came from all corners of child welfare, and in 1989, with the mission to find a family for every child in foster care, they formed the Foster Care Coalition of Greater St. Louis (now known as Foster & Adoptive Care Coalition.)

What began as a handful of reform-minded dreamers is now a cutting-edge leader in policy and practice. Thirty years in, our groundbreaking and data-driven work has created dramatic change in the lives of our region’s most vulnerable children. Because the Coalition is funded by private individuals and foundations, we have the freedom to innovate and test new strategies. Our community partners have come to rely on the Coalition for help with their most challenging cases. Policymakers at the state and, increasingly, the national level have identified our team as the experts to call in the face of complex child welfare challenges.

Early on, the team realized that many agencies duplicated services, wasting resources and dispersing expertise. With startup funding from a United Way Venture Grant in 1991, the Coalition began to identify and fill gaps in community services. By focusing on unmet needs, our highly independent, issue-focused teams could make a radical difference in outcomes in specific areas, while simultaneously setting the bar higher for others.

One example is our Educational Advocacy team. Launched in 2007, it is still the only foster-focused team of Educational Advocates in the country. Without intervention, children in foster care graduate high school at less than half the rate of their peers, and only 3% will graduate college. The Coalition’s team of lawyers and former teachers partner with schools to educate teachers and administrators about the unique needs of children impacted by foster care, and tirelessly advocate for their rights.

In 2008, the Coalition launched Extreme Recruitment®, a new approach to an intractable problem. For decades, older youth, sibling groups, and children with special needs had languished for years in foster care. Extreme Recruitment® took the unprecedented step of pairing private investigators with highly-trained social workers. By finding hundreds of family members, our team not only increased the odds of adoption, they found relatives to help with childcare, transportation, and respite care. Requests for help from our community partners exploded, and Extreme Recruitment® was even featured in TIME Magazine.

In 2011, the Coalition created 30 Days to Family®, applying lessons learned from Extreme Recruitment® to children just entering foster care. Decades of research showed that kids do better when placed with safe, appropriate relatives. Within a few years, the program was recognized for its unmatched outcomes, and the New York Times featured the Coalition for its innovative work developing 30 Days to Family®.

In fact, with support from our donors, the Coalition commissioned an independent, third-party study of the program. The results were stunning. Children served by 30 Days to Family found family quicker, spent less time in institutions, and were significantly less likely to be forced to move.

This work has become critical since the start of the opioid epidemic. In the last five years, the number of children entering foster care in St. Louis City has increased by 34%, and in the County by 29%. In the last 10 years there has been a 538% increase in babies born addicted to drugs.

Today, the Coalition’s groundbreaking work is being replicated in more than 20 sites around the country, including the rest of Missouri, Ohio, Virginia, New York, and Washington D.C. Our commitment to transparency, accountability, and rigorous self-improvement has made us a model for countless other agencies who want to do better on behalf of kids. As foster and adoptive care has become more family-focused and data-driven over the last 20 years, the Coalition has led that movement here in St. Louis. In 2018, the Coalition even won a prestigious innovation award from the internationally-renowned Council on Accreditation.

Our vision is that every child in our community has a place to call home, a family with whom they can grow and heal. But our team cannot realize that vision alone. Abuse and neglect, addiction and poverty – these scar our children but do not condemn them. Not when there are people willing to step up to say that every child, no matter their trauma, no matter their race or gender, deserves a family. Without that, the last 30 years would not have been possible. Because of that commitment, we cannot wait to see what the next 30 years have in store.


Jahkaiya, who is affectionately called “Tweety” by those who know and love her, is an 8-year-old girl with a heart of gold. Outgoing and friendly, she loves music, dolls, and stuffed animals. You can frequently catch her dancing along to her favorite songs and eating lots of her favorite snacks! Her favorite restaurants are Chuck E. Cheese and Burger King, because she loves the paper crowns she is given when she visits.  This princess has never met a stranger, and sometimes needs to be reminded of “stranger danger.” Jahkaiya requires close supervision due to her special needs, however, she doesn’t let that stop her. She is determined to achieve goals that are set for her and needs a loving, patient, and committed adoptive family that will help her thrive and meet her full potential. This is a legal risk placement, as Termination of Parental Rights is currently being pursued.

For more information, please contact:

Jan Joeckel – Director of General Recruitment

1750 South Brentwood Boulevard, Suite 210, Saint Louis, MO 63144
o 314.367.8373
janjoeckel@foster-adopt.org


16-year-old Lindsay is bubbly, witty, and comical. In her spare time, you’ll find her drawing, reading, playing the guitar, and shredding on her skateboard. Lindsay says she is most proud of her musical abilities and her resilience in overcoming life’s obstacles. Lindsay is a sophomore in high school and says math and science are her favorite subjects. She is on the honor roll and is proud of receiving A’s and B’s in the classroom.

Lindsay is ready to meet and move into a pre-adoptive home. She deserves a family that will meet her where she is in life, encouraging her with unconditional commitment, understanding, and belief in her talents and abilities. An adoptive family for Lindsay must be open to continuing counseling and the other supports Lindsay has in place, as well as allowing her to continue the important relationships from her past that have withstood the test of time.

For more information, please contact:

Jan Joeckel – Director of General Recruitment

1750 South Brentwood Boulevard, Suite 210, Saint Louis, MO 63144
o 314.367.8373
janjoeckel@foster-adopt.org


Joseph is an active and engaging 14 year old young man who has a huge heart! Joseph’s creativity is a great strength of his and often leads to masterpieces made with Legos. Like your typical teenage boy, Joseph also really enjoys playing video games, especially car racing games. Sometimes he also likes to relax and play card and board games as well. Joseph likes school and his favorite subject is Math. A huge accomplishment of Joseph’s this year is making the freshman football team. Thankfully after all that hard work, he has a hearty appetite to keep up his energy! His favorite meal is homemade fried chicken. He also really enjoys basketball. Joseph reports that when he grows up he wants to be a police officer or go into the military. Joseph also really likes animals and horses are his favorite animal. Joseph is also great helper!

For more information, please contact:

Jan Joeckel – Director of General Recruitment

1750 South Brentwood Boulevard, Suite 210, Saint Louis, MO 63144
o 314.367.8373
janjoeckel@foster-adopt.org


Damon is a sweet and loving twelve year old boy who loves books and reading.  Those who know Damon describe him as an incredibly sociable and charismatic child, noting that everyone who meets Damon falls in love with him.  Damon enjoys watching CNN and the News; he especially likes to be informed about the weather.  He is really beginning to come out of his shell enjoys the company of adults.  He has a very good memory and reports loving school. Math is his favorite subject and he generally receives good grades. His teacher describes him as a bright child who loves to help the other kids in the room when he is done with his work. She also describes him as a big helper in the classroom. He has a great appetite and loves peanut butter and jelly and mashed potatoes. Some of Damon’s favorite things include the color red and playing with remote control cars, walkie talkies, arts and crafts, and on playgrounds. Damon also lists board games among his favorite activities, especially Uno!  Damon thrives with one on one attention and would benefit from a loving, consistent, and active family.

For more information, please contact:

Jan Joeckel – Director of General Recruitment

1750 South Brentwood Boulevard, Suite 210, Saint Louis, MO 63144
o 314.367.8373
janjoeckel@foster-adopt.org


Six year old Chance lights up every room that he walks into. He has a megawatt smile and sweet nature. He has brownish red hair and sparkling green eyes. He is cheerful, loves to help, and you will be his best friend the minute you meet him. He loves to do chores such as taking out the trash and helping to put in a new bag, picking things up, and using a feather duster. Chance also loves to play! He likes play dough, doing puzzles of Mickey Mouse, and listening to songs on YouTube that he can dance to. Chance gets so excited when he learns new things and claps for himself at every accomplishment! He also loves to jump on the trampoline, play with the dogs, and go swimming. He’s especially daring and loves to go down the slide at the pool. Chance loves to eat! Like any typical six year old he loves applesauce, pizza, and cheese! Chance is in first grade this year and loves to go to school with his backpack.

https://www.ksdk.com/article/news/outreach/adoption/place-to-call-home-chance/63-523435114

For more information, please contact:

Jan Joeckel – Director of General Recruitment

1750 South Brentwood Boulevard, Suite 210, Saint Louis, MO 63144
o 314.367.8373
janjoeckel@foster-adopt.org


During the holidays, we are inundated with messages from a number of sources (movies, music, TV, social media, commercials) about how we should be feeling joyful, happy, and thankful. Surrounded by loving (and attractive) family, laughter, fancy food served at perfectly set tables and loads of expensive gifts, these images rarely reflect the truth for the majority of people. For children in foster care, conflicting loyalties and lost dreams can make the holidays an even more especially difficult time. They often report feeling especially vulnerable, lonely and sad, at a time when they are expected to feel exactly the opposite.

Click here to download a pdf of the following text.

What can those of us caring for these children and youth do or say to ease the pain?

Here are some things you might do:

1. Prepare the foster youth in your care for the holidays in your home

Have a discussion with the young person about your family’s holiday customs. Do you celebrate over multiple days, or is there one “main” celebration? Are there religious customs? Will gifts be exchanged? What should they wear? Who will they meet? What preparations need to be done in advance? Will there be visitors to the home? Will they be taken on visits to the homes of other family or friends? And in all of these events, will your youth be expected to participate? Knowing what to expect will help to decrease anxiety around the holidays. Avoid surprises and you will decrease seasonal tensions.

Of equal importance is to help them talk about their memories of the holidays. Be prepared for anything from fantasies to reports of no memories of anything at all. Give them space to talk and be prepared to validate any feelings they may share with you. Find ways to incorporate any traditions they remember into your family’s celebration.

2. Prepare friends and family before you visit

Let people know in advance about new family members in your home. Surprising a host or hostess at the door with a “new” foster youth may set up an awkward situation — such as a scramble to set an extra place at the table — making the young person feel like an imposition right from the start of the visit. Your preparation of friends should help cut down on awkward, but reasonable questions such as “who are you?” or “where did you come from?”

Also prepare the youth for what to expect. Talk about upcoming events and the people who will be there. If they have not met before, introduce them with old photos or stories about them. Prepare them for the “characters” in your family. Tell them if the celebration will be formal or informal, what to wear, what they will do there, if is a quiet or loud affair, and how long you will stay. If “please” and “thank you” will be expected, role play with the youth until they are comfortable with such expressions.

3. Remember confidentiality

You may receive well-intended but prying questions from those you visit with over the holidays. If your young person is new to your home, it is natural that family members ask questions about your youth’s background. As much as possible, have these conversations ahead of time, without the youth present. Understand that questions are generally not meant to be insensitive or rude, but simply come from a place of not knowing much about foster care. Think in advance about how to answer these questions while maintaining your youth’s confidentiality. Use the opportunity to educate interested family and friends. Pre-establish the boundaries for information sharing.

Discuss with your young person how they would like to be introduced and what is appropriate to share about their history with your family and friends. (Remember, they have no obligation to reveal their past.) Help them to set boundaries and consider a private “signal” to use if they feel uncomfortable or overwhelmed.

4. Arrange meeting your family in advance, if possible

The hustle and bustle of the holidays can make it particularly chaotic for your young person to participate in your family traditions. Anxiety may run high for young people already, and the stress of meeting your relatives may be a lot to deal with. If possible, you can arrange a casual “meeting” in advance of “main events.” If it is not possible or practical to meet beforehand, make a list of names of some of the people they’ll meet and their connection to you. You can also encourage a quick call from relatives you plan to visit to deliver a personal message of “we are excited to meet you” so that your youth knows they will be welcome. Consider making a “hostess” gift with the youth to present to the host of the party. Homemade gifts are always welcome!

5. Have extra presents ready to help offset differences

It should not be expected that all relatives purchase presents for your youth. Be prepared with other small gifts and for those family members that express concern over not having brought a gift, offer one of your “backups” for them to place under the tree. Extra presents may be addressed “from Santa”, even for older youth, to help offset a larger number of gifts other children may receive at the same time. Children often keep count of the number of gifts received (right or wrong) and use it to compare with other kids, so sometimes quantity is important.

At times, foster youth receive gifts from people they do not know. Asking a child to identify gift(s) for their wish list is often met with confusion, resistance or other equally charged emotions. We have to remind ourselves that our excitement and enthusiasm for these types of gifts may not be their experience. In some circumstances, these youth may not have celebrated Christmas before or they are not used to asking for a “gift” but rather for some basic need (i.e., toiletries or food). When encouraged to think “bigger”—beyond just what they need and ask for something that they want—foster children often struggle. Intense thoughts and fears arise: Am I disloyal to my birth parents by requesting/accepting gifts? Does this mean I won’t be home by Christmas?

It’s often our role to help foster youth understand that the community’s desire to give them gifts means only that they are loved. You may need to guard against well-meaning people’s desire to “give a happy holiday for such a deprived, abused little child,” protecting the children from such toxic sentiments.

6. Facilitate visits with loved ones

The holidays can be a busy time for everyone including foster parents and caseworkers. But it is especially important during this time of year to help your young person arrange for visits with loved ones. Don’t allow busy schedules to mean the postponement of these important visits. Try to get permission for your youth to make phone calls to relatives. A youth may wish to extend holiday wishes to relatives and friends from an old neighborhood, but may need your help getting phone numbers together. Use the opportunity to help the youth develop their own address book. If the youth cannot visit, consider including their birth families in your thoughts and prayers. If you are making homemade gifts, consider making ones for the birth family, even if they cannot be delivered immediately.

This is a time when many foster youth feel deeply conflicted about their birth families and worry about them. It is a good time to let them know it is okay for them to be safe and cared for even if their birth family is struggling. Reassure them, if you can, about the safety and care of those they are missing.

7. Help them make sure their loved ones are okay

Young people may worry that their family members are struggling through the holidays. If homelessness has been a regular issue, the winter season may bring cold weather and extreme hardship. Your youth may experience guilt if they feel a loved one is struggling while they, the youth, are living in comfort. Knowing that a biological parent or sibling has shelter from the cold or has their other basic needs met may ease a young person’s mind through the always emotional holidays.

8. Extend an invitation

If it is safe and allowed by your foster care agency, consider extending an invitation to siblings or birth parents through the holidays. It need not be an invitation to your “main” holiday event, consider a “special” dinner for your youth to celebrate with their loved ones. If this not a possibility to do within your home, consider arranging a visit at a local restaurant (ask the caseworker is it would be appropriate for the visit to be unsupervised or if your supervision would suffice). Extending an invitation to their loved ones need not signal to a young person that you support their birth family’s lifestyle or choices — rather it tells a young person that you respect their wish to stay connected to family. You will also send a message to the youth that they aren’t being put in a position to “choose” your family over their bio-family and that it is possible to have a relationship with all the people they care about.

9. Understand and encourage your youth’s own traditions and beliefs

Encourage discussion about the holiday traditions your young person experienced prior to being in foster care, or even celebrations they liked while living with other foster families. Incorporate the traditions the youth cherishes into your own family celebration, if possible. Use the opportunity to investigate the youth’s culture and research customary traditions. If the young person holds a religious belief different from yours, or if their family did, check into the traditions customarily surrounding those beliefs.

10. Assist in purchasing or making holiday gifts or in sending cards to their family and friends

Allow young people to purchase small gifts for their relatives, or help them craft homemade gifts. Help send holiday cards to those that they want to stay connected with. The list of people that your youth wishes to send cards and gifts to should be left completely to the youth, although precautions may be taken to ensure safety (for example, a return address may be left off the package, or use the address of the foster care agency) and compliance with any court orders.

11. Understand if they pull away

Despite your best efforts, a young person may simply withdraw during the holidays. Understand that this detachment most likely is not intended to be an insult or a reflection of how they feel about you, but rather is their own coping mechanism. Allow for “downtime” during the holidays that will allow the youth some time to themselves if they need it (although some youth would prefer to stay busy to keep their mind off other things — you will need to make a decision based on your knowledge of the young person). Be sure to fit in one-on-one time, personal time for your youth and you to talk through what they are feeling during this emotional and often confusing time of year.

12. Call youth who formerly lived with you

The holidays can be a particularly tough time for youth who have recently aged out of foster care. They may not have people to visit or a place to go for the holidays. In addition, young people commonly struggle financially when they first leave foster care. A single phone call may lift their spirits and signal that you continue to care for them and treasure their friendship. Be sure to include these youth on your own holiday card list. A small token gift or gift basket of homemade holiday goodies may be especially appreciated. Most importantly, it is essential to let adoptees, foster children, and those who have aged out of the system know that they are not alone and they are not to blame for their losses.

Understandable behavioral reactions:

Be prepared for the sadness and grief. Talk about your child’s feelings throughout the season.

Give your children time and space to grieve. Grief takes many forms and may be exhibited in lots of ways, including:

  • Reverting back to younger behaviors developmentally
  • Soiling themselves or bedwetting
  • Becoming withdrawn and isolated
  • Having temper tantrums
  • Being rebellious
  • Complaining more than usual
  • Needing to be extra busy to avoid feeling

Try to remember the developmental age of the children you foster. It will also help you to stay patient if you keep in mind the challenges of the season for your child before you react.

Expressions of gratitude don’t often come readily from kids in foster care. Not because they aren’t grateful, but more often because they are in survival mode, especially during the holidays. Amazingly, more kids than not want to know who they can thank for their gifts. Help them to write thank you notes or make “thank you” phone calls to those who made their day extra special.

Religious Differences & the Holidays

The holidays can be tough for foster families. Children in care miss their families and their traditions, while at the same time they may want to be part of the activities of the foster family. When there’s a religious difference between the child’s family and the foster family, things can become even more complicated.

Religion can be a sensitive issue. Legally, birth parents have the right to choose their children’s religion or lack of religion. Placement of their child in foster care does not take away this right.

Of course, most foster parents try to respect the culture and religious customs of the children in their care. But what does this mean when it comes to religion?

The answer lies in establishing open lines of communication among foster parents, DSS, and the birth family. If your agency knows how you feel about religious issues (for example, if prayer makes you feel uncomfortable, or if you feel compelled to convert children and their families), it will make informed placement decisions.

This communication works both ways. The more you know about the religion, traditions, and preferences of birth families, the easier it will be for you to act in a way that honors their beliefs.


Arianna is a sweet and vivacious child. Her charming personality and bright smile are hard to overlook. Arianna is 10 years old and in the fourth grade. She loves being a “girly-girl” but has no problem switching it up and dressing down when necessary. Arianna enjoys all types of animals, crafts, Dork Diaries and everything that is the color red. She relishes in being active and would do well with a family that enjoys spending quality time together. Arianna adores when her caregivers take time to do her hair and loves when people say she has an eccentric and creative sense of style, especially when it involves dressing. Arianna is able to effectively communicate her needs and feelings without much difficulty, but she will need a family that is able to continue to enhance this skill. Arianna also enjoys helping others!

Legally free for adoption, Arianna will need a family that is able to provide a calm and predictable environment for her; in addition, to being experienced and trauma informed. Her ideal family would be a two parent home with at least a female parent figure. The team is not opposed to a single female parent, but it will be important for her to have a strong support system and the ability to commit to the one-on-time that Arianna will continuously need. Potential families will also need to facilitate and encourage ongoing contact with Arianna’s sister, who has been adopted separately, through phone contact or visitation.

For more information, please contact:

Jan Joeckel – Director of General Recruitment

1750 South Brentwood Boulevard, Suite 210, Saint Louis, MO 63144
o 314.367.8373
janjoeckel@foster-adopt.org

 


Jeremesha, Floyd, and Jermain are a beautiful sibling group of three who need a family who will help them learn about the world around them.

Jeremesha is a happy 5 year old little girl. She is great big sister. As the oldest, Jeremesha is independent. She does a great job getting dressed and especially loves matching her favorite outfits to shoes. She is intelligent and a big help to others. Jeremesha enjoys helping around the house. She loves setting the table and cleaning up after herself.

Floyd is a sweet 4 year old boy. He loves hugs and holding hands. A curious young boy, he is very eager to learn. Floyd loves blocks and has a great talent for building. He even plans it out ahead of time in his mind and puts his vision into form. With a love for music, his other favorite toys are his musical ones. When he is done with all that playing, he also takes good care of his toys and picks up after himself.

Jermain is 3 years old. He is loving and enjoys snuggle time most of all. Like his big brother, he also loves to learn. He, too, enjoys playing with blocks. He likes to build them up but mainly to have the fun of knocking them down afterwards. This sweet little guy gets his feelings hurt easily but is good at expressing himself and lets others know when he is upset about something.

For more information, please contact:

Edna Green – Wendy’s Wonderful Kids Recruiter

1750 South Brentwood Boulevard, Suite 210, Saint Louis, MO 63144
o 314.367.8373
c 314.614.2413
ednagreen@foster-adopt.org


Brandon is an active, kind, and friendly young man. This 13-year-old is a pleasure to be with and his smile will light up any room! By others, Brandon is described as talkative, social, and inquisitive. He describes himself as smart and funny; saying he likes to humor others with his jokes and stories. When he’s not making others laugh, you can find him playing outside, listening to music, and spending time with friends.

With a family, Brandon envisions having several family dogs, walking them with his parents and siblings, and doing other fun activities as a family. He would thrive with a kind, patient understanding family that would help him reach his potential. If you can provide this great kiddo with a loving and committed home, we urge you to inquire. Financial assistance may be available for adoption-related services.

For more information, please contact:

Jan Joeckel – Director of General Recruitment

1750 South Brentwood Boulevard, Suite 210, Saint Louis, MO 63144
o 314.367.8373
janjoeckel@foster-adopt.org


Ryan is an upbeat, charismatic 13-year-old. In his spare time, you can find him building new Lego creations, honing his video game skills, and learning all the words to his favorite songs. When asked to describe himself in three words, he says that he is smart, funny, and creative. Ryan thinks school is awesome and loves learning. He can’t narrow down a favorite subject because he thinks they are all equally fascinating and prides himself on trying his best in the classroom.

Ryan is eager to be adopted and says that for him, adoption means being cared for by a loving family forever. He looks forward to the day that he can belong to a family and feel accepted and celebrated. Ryan’s caseworker will consider all family types for placement.

For more information, please contact:

Jan Joeckel – Director of General Recruitment

1750 South Brentwood Boulevard, Suite 210, Saint Louis, MO 63144
o 314.367.8373
janjoeckel@foster-adopt.org


Colton has great big brown eyes and a smile that will light up a room! This 5-year-old cutie is naturally happy, curious, and loving to the people in his life. He is easy to smile, giggle, and make eye contact to show his preference and affection for those closest to him. His favorite things are being snuggled, tickled, and rocked by his care providers. He is also thrilled by the opportunity to drive his motorized toy car!
 
At preschool, Colton excels in social interactions and loves his teachers and peers. Motivated and enthusiastic, Colton follows simple instructions, uses switches to direct activities, and vocalizes to initiate interaction with his peers. He is also showing progress in using his walker.

Colton will do well in a family who has the resources and knowledge to raise and support him. He is a joy to know, and an even greater joy to love. With the right adoptive family, in a home of his own, Colton will surely thrive.

Joshua has an infectious laugh and a great smile! This happy child adores spending quality one-on-one time with others and especially loves being tickled. Listening to his music is his favorite activity. He lights up when his favorite songs are played and has a special affinity for classical music. Being outdoors is Joshua’s happy place. He enjoys the soothing sounds of nature and is especially excited when he spots animals or has the opportunity to interact with them.

Joshua is a resilient young man who craves a family. He thrives on consistency, attention, and affirming words. His caseworker will consider all family types for placement.

Jan Joeckel – Director of General Recruitment

1750 South Brentwood Boulevard, Suite 210, Saint Louis, MO 63144
o 314.367.8373
janjoeckel@foster-adopt.org


Serenity is a beautiful 15 year old who is ready for a family! She is a happy child, who likes to sing and dance. Serenity loves all things girly. She enjoys doing her makeup, getting her hair and nails done, and anything regarding fashion.  Serenity is very bright. She does well in school overall but does sometimes struggle when she is bored. Serenity is not a picky eater and she has a large appetite. Her favorite foods are pizza, hot wings, and cheese fries. She does not like squash or onions, and she is allergic to seafood. She likes fast food. Serenity has big dreams for herself, and wants to go to college after she graduates high school.

Serenity has been in foster care several years. As a result, she has a hard time learning to trust new people. Once she is comfortable with someone and understands their boundaries and expectations, she can do well. She would do best in a home with no other children, as she enjoys having one-on-one attention and having the focus on her.

Serenity is a resilient young lady who wants to be part of a forever family. She thrives on consistency and positive attention.

For more information, please contact:

Jan Joeckel – Director of General Recruitment

1750 South Brentwood Boulevard, Suite 210, Saint Louis, MO 63144
o 314.367.8373
janjoeckel@foster-adopt.org


Being funny, kind, and a good listener are just a few of the many great things about 11-year-old Levelle! Building Legos or hunting for bugs quickly captures his attention, and he also likes playing video games. For a special treat, Levelle loves trips to Six Flags or adventuring to new places and discovering all they have to offer.

If you ask Levelle, he’ll say that “school is cool.” His favorite subjects are math and science. He has a creative mind and loves using his imagination to build Lego robotics. Those who know him, describe Levelle as having a sensitive spirit and a bright smile. While he can be shy at first, his joyful personality and excitement for new things will captivate any family.

Go-with-the-flow, nurturing, and child-centered parents will be a great match for Levelle. He will thrive in a family where he is the focus of attention and can be showered with the individualized attention he needs and craves. If you have a dog, even better! Levelle has a heart for animals and is hoping to have a canine companion in his forever home. An enriching learning environment with caregivers that are willing to play, explore, and engage in a variety of activities will be a perfect fit for this outstanding child.

For more information, please contact:

Jan Joeckel – Director of General Recruitment

1750 South Brentwood Boulevard, Suite 210, Saint Louis, MO 63144
o 314.367.8373
janjoeckel@foster-adopt.org


David is a sweet five year old boy looking for a forever family! His infectious smile shows off his charming dimples. David has good eye contact and enjoys engaging with adults and other kids. David can be silly, laughs easily, and revels in one-on-one attention. David is independent and likes to try to do most everything himself or with only a little assistance. He enjoys school and generally does well with instructions and activities. David wears glasses at school, but likes to have a break from them when at home. You would never know from his slender frame that David has a great appetite and has never met a food he does not like! David does have special needs and will require a patient and nurturing family that is committed to being his cheerleader, coach, and most importantly, his loving forever family. This is a legal risk adoption.

For more information, please contact:

Jan Joeckel – Director of General Recruitment

1750 South Brentwood Boulevard, Suite 210, Saint Louis, MO 63144
o 314.367.8373
janjoeckel@foster-adopt.org

 


Edward, a charming 14 year old, has the sweetest smile and kindest heart. Edward’s favorite things include basketball, video games, and basketball-involved video games! (Do you see a trend here?) He also likes football, Call of Duty, and surprising others with his acrobatic talents. For example, Edward taught himself to do front flips, back flips, and even head stands. Don’t be surprised if Edward whips out a random headstand when he’s bored. Besides not liking liver and scrambled eggs, Edward is pretty easy going. In the future, he would love to play a professional sport, but has also considered professions as a doctor or sports analyst. Edward deeply cares about others, especially his older sister, De’Zirya. Edward is a natural observer and listener, but can be chatty and goofy when the time is right.

For those who are licensed foster/adoptive parents, please contact:

Heather Roberts – Extreme Recruiter

1750 South Brentwood Boulevard, Suite 210, Saint Louis, MO 63144
o 314.367.8373
heatherroberts@foster-adopt.org

For those who are not licensed foster/adoptive parents, please contact:

Jan Joeckel – Director of General Recruitment

1750 South Brentwood Boulevard, Suite 210, Saint Louis, MO 63144
o 314.367.8373
janjoeckel@foster-adopt.org


Elias is a handsome 14 year old who has a special talent for drawing. He is a freshman this year and he recently joined Art Club and Card club at school. His preferred subject at school is Science. When he first meets someone he can be very shy, but is engaging once he warms up. Elias really enjoys playing video games, especially on PS4. He is unsure of what he would like to do when he finishes school, but being a video game designer is on the list. He describes himself as kind, funny, honest, and mature. Others describe Elias as a sweet kid with a big heart. He is a great helper around the house who makes dinner once a week. His favorite food is tacos!

 

For those who are licensed foster/adoptive parents, please contact:

Amanda Denning – Extreme Recruiter

1750 South Brentwood Boulevard, Suite 210, Saint Louis, MO 63144
o 314.367.8373
amandadenning@foster-adopt.org

For those who are not licensed foster/adoptive parents, please contact:

Jan Joeckel – Director of General Recruitment

1750 South Brentwood Boulevard, Suite 210, Saint Louis, MO 63144
o 314.367.8373
janjoeckel@foster-adopt.org


Christina is the youngest of the sibling group, and is always happy, friendly, and helpful. She enjoys singing, playing basketball, and watching the Disney Channel. Her favorite foods are oatmeal and spaghetti. Christina responds very well to encouragement and praise.

Anthony is the second youngest, and he is also a friendly, helpful boy. He enjoys robotics, karate, watching Disney Jr., and soccer. There isn’t a food that he doesn’t enjoy. When you meet Anthony, you will notice that he is always smiling, talking, and very cooperative.

Jaylen is the second oldest, and is outgoing, very helpful, and likes to be an authority figure for his siblings. He enjoys all sports (football being his favorite), watching kid movies, and is in Cub Scouts. Jaylen’s favorite food is hot dogs. When you meet Jaylen, you will see that enjoys being in leadership roles, and responds well to praises and rewards.

Jaylah is the oldest of this sibling group, and is the mature one of the group. She enjoys drawing, reading, and helping out in the kitchen. Jaylah is very friendly, always smiling, and likes to be around older children in the home. Jaylah responds well to rewards, and words of wisdom.

The children are legally free for adoption. The team would like them placed with an adoptive family as soon as possible so attachment can begin. It will be important that the selected family would maintain ongoing contact with their biological brother that is currently out of state.

For those who are not licensed foster/adoptive parents, please contact:

Jan Joeckel – Director of General Recruitment

1750 South Brentwood Boulevard, Suite 210, Saint Louis, MO 63144
o 314.367.8373
janjoeckel@foster-adopt.org


Kejuan is a 15-year-old young man who loves sports. He enjoys watching and playing any type of sport, but specifically has a strong love for basketball. He could tell you anything you’d want to know about it and lights up when discussing his favorite teams, players, and their performance statistics. Kejuan is in the 10th grade and considers English his best and favorite subject. He plans to carry that passion into his future studies at Mizzou, where he will major in journalism. He sees himself pursuing a career in sports journalism when he graduates. Kejuan loves spending time with family and friends and is hoping to find an accepting family that will be there for him through all of life’s joys and tribulations. He is deeply loving, personable, and can find the silver lining in any situation; maintaining that a positive attitude can take you everywhere. Kejuan is exceptionally open to the prospect of a forever family and says he never underestimates the power of “putting himself out there.”

 
For those who are licensed foster/adoptive parents, please contact:

Jan Joeckel – Director of General Recruitment

1750 South Brentwood Boulevard, Suite 210, Saint Louis, MO 63144
o 314.367.8373
janjoeckel@foster-adopt.org


Garrett is a very energetic 12 year old boy.  He has blonde hair, blue eyes, and an adorable smile!  Garrett loves playing outside and has a passion for animals.  He is a very funny child and likes to be the center of attention.  In Garrett’s free time he likes to play Minecraft and ride his bike. He also enjoys playing basketball and going swimming. Garrett likes going places such as Skyzone and going out to eat. Garrett is not a picky eater. His favorite dessert is pecan pie. Garrett enjoys drawing and painting so it is no surprise that his favorite subject in school is art.

Garrett is legally free for adoption.  He is ready to be adopted and have a family.  Garrett does have an older sibling with whom he would like to maintain some type of contact. Garrett desires a family that will love him and looks forward to having a consistent “mom” and “dad” in his life.

 

For those who are licensed foster/adoptive parents, please contact:

Jan Joeckel – Director of General Recruitment

1750 South Brentwood Boulevard, Suite 210, Saint Louis, MO 63144
o 314.367.8373
janjoeckel@foster-adopt.org